In response to People who feel justice and revenge are one in the same. . “News Flash – NOT!”

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Ok, so If the behavior of one person, offers the right to the other person who is the recipient of the behavior of the first, is allowed to avenge with out consequence, then where it is said or written, that allow us to ask for impeachment when what we are wanting is the same in kind to what the person we are asking for impeachment bestowed upon us.
humm
so I did one better I looked 2 of the popular words that came up in the las few postings, and here is how they are defined: sorce cied also; here’s what I found,

jus•tice
is rendering to every one that which is his due. It has been distinguished from equity in this respect,
that while justice means merely the doing what positive law demands, equity means the doing what
is fair and right in every separate case.

– Cite; Chicago Manual Style (CMS):
JUSTICE. Dictionary.com. Easton’s 1897 Bible Dictionary. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/JUSTICE (accessed: July 03, 2008)

Justice –

• noun 1 just behaviour or treatment. 2 the quality of being just. 3 the administration of law or some other authority according to the principles of just behaviour and treatment. 4 a judge or magistrate.

— PHRASES bring someone to justice arrest and try someone in court for a crime. do oneself justice perform as well as one is able. do someone/thing justice treat or represent someone or something with due fairness.

— ORIGIN Old French justise “administration of the law”, from Latin jus ‘law, right’.

revenge [rəˈvendʒ] verb
(with on) to get (one’s) revenge
Example: He revenged himself on his enemies; I’ll soon be revenged on you all.

revenge

• noun 1 retaliation for an injury or wrong. 2 the desire to inflict such retaliation.

• verb 1 (revenge oneself or be revenged) inflict revenge for an injury or wrong done to oneself. 2 inflict revenge on behalf of (someone else) or for (a wrong or injury).

— PHRASES revenge is a dish best served (or eaten) cold proverb vengeance is often more satisfying if it is delayed.

— ORIGIN Old French revencher, from Latin vindicare ‘claim, avenge’.

So I am not sure when, where or how these two words became co-joined , WAKE up! the eye for and eye dark age stuff, arn’r we progressive democrats here?
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By finnperkinsJuly 3, 2008 – 11:54am

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